Blog: Pensions and Human Capital

Arizona’s teacher pension system is complex, expensive, and fails to produce an adequate retirement benefit for the majority of its teacher members.
Alaska’s 2005 teacher pension system reform legislation provides a unique opportunity to examine what happens when a state closes its teacher pension plan. We’ve collected pre and post reform data to examine teacher workforce impact in the wake of retirement plan changes. While it is important to note that these trends should not be interpreted as causal, we feel there are meaningful takeaways all the same.
A new study finds that teachers live the longest of all public employees. That's great news for them, but can come with increased costs for state pension systems.
On teacher pensions, there’s a chasm between what’s promised and the outcomes for the overwhelming majority of teachers. The commonly held notion of a teacher working 30-35 years and retiring with a gold plated pension is largely fiction.
Teacher pension funds are complicated and can be difficult to understand. In fact, Arizona's teacher pension plan is particularly complicated. This post explains how the system works and explains how it affects teachers' retirement.
This post digs into worker retention data from Arkansas and notes that there are reasons to doubt how much pension plans affect worker retention rates.
Without looking at all forms of compensation or adjusting for cost of living, average teacher salary rankings don’t tell us all that much.
A new report finds that district spending on benefits has grown at a rate that far outpaces the district's overall spending on K-12. As a result, benefits take an increasingly large bite out of district education budgets.
To what extent do different rates of educational attainment among men and women contribute to the gender-based salary gap? Based on our analysis, the higher rate of educational attainment for women is insufficient to overcome other barriers to higher salaries.
One of the most common teacher salary questions is whether or not teachers get paid over the summer months. So, do they? It depends. Teacher payroll schedules vary district-to-district: some allow workers to spread their 10-month salary over 12 months, while others don’t give any paycheck during the summer months, requiring teachers to budget, or in some cases, get a second job.