Blog: Alternative Models

How worried should we be about inequality among retirees?
While traditional, back-loaded pension plans fall short of providing adequate retirement benefits to all members, there are better options. And, contrary to a public debate that often pits pensions against 401ks, there are other alternatives that would better balance the needs of employers and employees.
Kentucky's move to a cash balance plan will be good for the state, and for future Kentucky teachers.
Colorado teachers deserve a say over their retirement benefits.
Defined benefit pension plans play multiple roles, and we have to clearly distinguish those roles in order to consider possible alternatives.
After zooming out and looking across the full working career, it becomes clearer that a portable benefit plan would be better for most teachers.
States can shift new workers into new retirement plans easier than many pension advocates claim.
Changes in the retirement plan offered to federal workers can teach us lessons about the retirement plans state and local governments offer to teachers.
Pension reform would likely benefit South Carolina's teachers and students.
Michigan is about to adopt legislation that would enroll new teachers in a portable defined contribution plan, with a shorter vesting period and more money going toward teacher retirements. That will cost the state a bit more money, but it's a win for teachers.