Blog: Funding

California' legislature recently approved a onetime payment of $1 billion for the state's school districts. However, it won't translate into a real increase in district budgets since those funds are hardly enough to cover burgeoning pension costs.
Over the last 15 years, teacher salaries have risen less than inflation, but insurance and retirement costs have risen much faster.
Judge recently dismissed CPS's lawsuit claiming the state funds schools inequitably and operates an inequitable pension system. As a a result, the district once again faces serious finance troubles and Gov. Rauner is withholding $215 million for CPS until the legislature enacts pension reforms.
Puerto Rico’s pension system is an accelerated example of pension problems in the rest of the country. This is where many states are headed if they don't make reforms now.
Teacher pension systems compound inequitable school funding formulas. In Illinois, the state teacher pension fund funnels less money to the kids who need it the most.
School district spending on employee benefits has growth quickly. Now, over 22 percent of per pupil expenditures goes toward benefits payments. On average $2,524 is spent per student on benefits alone.
As CA districts take on the majority of pension contribution increases, money that could otherwise go toward raising teacher salaries, combating teacher shortages, hiring classroom aides, or expanding pre-k will instead go to paying down the state’s pension debt.
Breaking down the options for states facing large unfunded pension liabilities.
Pennsylvania's pension contribution rates look like a roller coaster. That ride has not been good to teachers, schools, or taxpayers.
Education advocates have a lot on their plates. Common Core. School accountability systems. Teacher policy. Pre-k. Here's why they should consider adding teacher pension reform to their lists.